Oxford Baptist Underground

Originating From a Secret Bunker Dug By William Hosea Holcombe and J.B. Gambrell Somewhere Off the Square in Oxford, Mississippi

The Baptist Message On Resolution 9

Will Hall, the Executive Editor of Louisiana’s Baptist Message, gives his analysis of Resolution 9.  See his June 19th article entitled “SBC Resolutions Include Approval of ‘Marxist’ Theories as ‘Analytical Tools.’

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Secular Conservative Media Calls Out SBC Over Resolution 9

Referring to the adoption of Resolution 9 at the 2019 Southern Baptist Convention, Matthew Garnett at the Federalist asserts that the convention “is being infiltrated by an ideology that is antithetical to the Christian religion, right under the noses of SBC members.”  To read the entire article, click here.

Bad Form: Resolution 9 at the SBC

A resolution denouncing Critical Race Theory and intersectionality was submitted this past week by a messenger (delegate) to the 2019 Southern Baptist Convention meeting in Birmingham, Alabama (see original resolution here). However, the convention’s Resolutions Committee jammed through a re-engineered resolution – Resolution 9 – in the closing minutes of the convention referring to Critical Race Theory and intersectionality as “analytical tools” (see the final resolution here).  The problem is that these so-called “tools” are not derived in any way from Scripture but rather arise from philosophical, sociological, and political constructions like Critical Theory.  For a more detailed analysis of what occurred at the convention see “Resolution 9 and the Southern Baptist Convention 2019.”

Kickin’ It Old School

The older Calvinistic Southern Baptists of Founders Ministries – the ones who were Calvinists before Calvinism was cool – take the Young, Restless, and Woke to task.  Follow the link to a panel discussion entitled “The Gospel and Justice” from the recent National Founders Conference held in Louisville, Kentucky.

Baptists Have Gone Done This Road Before

Ecclesiastes 1:9 says “there is no new thing under the sun.”  And social justice is nothing new.  Watch this episode of Wretched Radio .

“Whiteness”

What is “whiteness”?  Darrell Harrison and Virgil Walker discuss it on the Just Thinking podcast.  To listen, click here.

What is Social Justice?

Dr. Vodie Baucham gives an excellent lecture on the subject.  Watch “Defining Social Justice.”

For Such a Time as This

As of today, the Southern Baptist Convention is a hot mess.  Although the Oxford Baptist Underground primarily focuses on issues relating to Eric Hankins’ Traditional Statement, we are not blind to the goings-on within the convention. Besides the Calvinist-Hankinist debate, there are other cultural issues like the Alt-right, Critical Race Theory and the #MeToo Movement that are wreaking havoc. Things have become so serious that Albert Mohler recently posted an article on Southern’s website entitled, “The Wrath of God Poured Out – The Humiliation of the Southern Baptist Convention.

The purpose of this blog post, however, is not to discuss the different cultural issues.*  Rather, in light of these difficult times, the matter at hand involves who is the best man to lead our convention forward when it convenes in Dallas on June 12th.  It would appear that we need a president who is both a proven leader but also a fresh face, someone committed to the principles of the conservative resurgence but without the baggage. It is our opinion that J.D. Greear is the man “for such a time as this.”  May the Lord have mercy on us.

Addendum (6/16/18):  J.D. Greear received nearly 70% of the vote and is now the new SBC president.  And while we believe he was the best candidate for the job, we also realize that it will take much wisdom to lead our convention forward in these perilous times.  For now, the above-mentioned cultural issues appear to have taken the spotlight, pretty much pushing the Calvinist/Hankinist debate into the shadows.  Let us pray for Bro. Greear and all those leading our denomination. 

*This has changed somewhat as of 3/1/19 (see the tab above labeled “Purpose of This Blog”).

Hubris, Not Doctrine

Calvinism . . . promotes unparalleled theological snobbery and querulousness.”

– Eric Hankins, 2017 Connect 316 Banquet

One of the complaints you most often hear about Calvinistic preachers, especially the younger ones, is that they tear churches apart – they gather together a group of followers then forcibly try to take over a church.  Regrettably, I know this to be true.  But I submit that the divisive nature of such tactics has more to do with immature zeal and/or hubris than Calvinist doctrine.  Why?  Because I’m hearing credible reports about some Hankinist preachers in the area, men who openly hold to the Traditional Statement, doing the same thing.  They start by collecting a group of minions, then they attempt to impose their will on the church – from firing Calvinistic staff to alienating long-time members, even some who’ve supported the Traditional Statement themselves.  My sources also indicate that at least one of these preachers was well on his way to tearing his church apart.  But before that happened, he suddenly (and surprisingly to many) departed for greener pastures.  Still, he left in his wake a church full of confusion, chaos, and resentment.

My point here is that such behavior, even snobbery and querulousness, is not exclusive (or inherent) to Calvinism.  If that were the case, then these Hankinist preachers – who are by no means Calvinists – would not be doing the exact same thing.

Why SBC Seminary Enrollment Alarms Hankinists

In 1986, the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, was the largest seminary in the world with over 4,000 students. At the time, the inerrancy of Scripture was the hot-button issue in the Southern Baptist Convention. Southwestern benefited in no small measure because it was viewed as the most conservative of the six SBC seminaries. Consequently, many students went to Southwestern because of its perceived commitment to inerrancy, at least in a relative sense.

Fast forward 32 years, and all six SBC seminaries are now considered conservative – they all have an extremely high view of Scripture. So the hot-button issue today is no longer inerrancy, but rather a bubbling conflict between two doctrinal statements with two markedly different soteriological positions. The first statement is the historic Abstract of Principles, which is the confessional statement at both the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, and at the Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forest, North Carolina. The second statement is Dr. Eric Hankins’ Traditional Statement (TS). Although it has no official status, the TS has been signed by both Paige Patterson*, president of the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary mentioned above and Chuck Kelley, president of the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary in New Orleans, Louisiana. The issue in this controversy is the soteriological direction of our denomination. Shall we return to our roots (the Abstract) or shall we progress in a new direction (TS)? Dr. Hankins, in his 2017 speech at the Connect 316 Banquet made his position clear. He said unequivocally, “I believe that we need to call for the removal of the Abstract of Principles as the confessional statement of Southern and Southeastern.”

But why the concern? In 1986, Southwestern was perceived as the best seminary and students flocked to it because it was the inerrancy school. Today, however, both Southwestern and New Orleans are viewed differently. They are now seen as the TS friendly schools while Southern and Southeastern are seen as the Abstract seminaries. So what do the 2017-18 enrollment figures tell us. Well, according to the Association of Theological Schools’ most recent statistical report, the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, is now the largest seminary in the world with 3,157 students. That’s a 36.3% increase from 1986. Southeastern’s enrollment has also climbed an impressive 99.4% in the same period. But Southwestern’s enrollment, while still large, is considerably smaller than it was 32 years ago. It’s enrollment has dropped 36.8% since 1986; New Orleans’ has fallen 17.2%.

So then why are students now flocking to Southern and Southeastern? It’s definitely not because it’s cheaper. In 2017, the estimated price for a married student to attend Southern was actually the highest of all SBC seminaries (74% higher than Southwestern).  So what is the attraction? 32 years ago students went to Southwestern because of inerrancy, and inerrancy won the day. Could it be that students today want a school where historic Southern Baptist doctrines (the Abstract) are actually believed and taught? If so, then the Abstract could possibly win the day. No doubt about it, if Southwestern and New Orleans were growing like Southern and Southeastern, the Hankinists would not be nearly as alarmed.

*It’s interesting to note that Paige Patterson also signed the Abstract of Principles when he was president at Southeastern. What mental gymnastics he used to affirm two irreconcilable statements is anyone’s guess.