Oxford Baptist Underground

Originating From a Secret Bunker Dug By William Hosea Holcombe and J.B. Gambrell Somewhere Off the Square in Oxford, Mississippi

For Such a Time as This

As of today, the Southern Baptist Convention is a hot mess.  Although the Oxford Baptist Underground primarily focuses on issues relating to Eric Hankins’ Traditional Statement, we are not blind to the goings-on within the convention. Besides the Calvinist-Hankinist debate, there are other cultural issues like the Alt-right, Critical Race Theory and the #MeToo Movement that are wreaking havoc. Things have become so serious that Albert Mohler recently posted an article on Southern’s website entitled, “The Wrath of God Poured Out – The Humiliation of the Southern Baptist Convention.

The purpose of this blog post, however, is not to discuss the different cultural issues.  Rather, in light of these difficult times, the matter at hand involves who is the best man to lead our convention forward when it convenes in Dallas on June 12th.  It would appear that we need a president who is both a proven leader but also a fresh face, someone committed to the principles of the conservative resurgence but without the baggage. It is our opinion that J.D. Greear is the man “for such a time as this.”  May the Lord have mercy on us.

Addendum (6/16/18):  J.D. Greear received nearly 70% of the vote and is now the new SBC president.  And while we believe he was the best candidate for the job, we also realize that it will take much wisdom to lead our convention forward in these perilous times.  For now, the above-mentioned cultural issues are in the spotlight, pretty much pushing the Calvinist/Hankinist debate into the shadows.  Let us pray for Bro. Greear and all those leading our denomination.

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Hubris, Not Doctrine

Calvinism . . . promotes unparalleled theological snobbery and querulousness.”

– Eric Hankins, 2017 Connect 316 Banquet

One of the complaints you most often hear about Calvinistic preachers, especially the younger ones, is that they tear churches apart – they gather together a group of followers then forcibly try to take over a church.  Regrettably, I know this to be true.  But I submit that the divisive nature of such tactics has more to do with immature zeal and/or hubris than Calvinist doctrine.  Why?  Because I’m hearing credible reports about some Hankinist preachers in the area, men who openly hold to the Traditional Statement, doing the same thing.  They start by collecting a group of minions, then they attempt to impose their will on the church – from firing Calvinistic staff to alienating long-time members, even some who’ve supported the Traditional Statement themselves.  My sources also indicate that at least one of these preachers was well on his way to tearing his church apart.  But before that happened, he suddenly (and surprisingly to many) departed for greener pastures.  Still, he left in his wake a church full of confusion, chaos, and resentment.

My point here is that such behavior, even snobbery and querulousness, is not exclusive (or inherent) to Calvinism.  If that were the case, then these Hankinist preachers – who are by no means Calvinists – would not be doing the exact same thing.

Why SBC Seminary Enrollment Alarms Hankinists

In 1986, the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, was the largest seminary in the world with over 4,000 students. At the time, the inerrancy of Scripture was the hot-button issue in the Southern Baptist Convention. Southwestern benefited in no small measure because it was viewed as the most conservative of the six SBC seminaries. Consequently, many students went to Southwestern because of its perceived commitment to inerrancy, at least in a relative sense.

Fast forward 32 years, and all six SBC seminaries are now considered conservative – they all have an extremely high view of Scripture. So the hot-button issue today is no longer inerrancy, but rather a bubbling conflict between two doctrinal statements with two markedly different soteriological positions. The first statement is the historic Abstract of Principles, which is the confessional statement at both the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, and at the Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forest, North Carolina. The second statement is Dr. Eric Hankins’ Traditional Statement (TS). Although it has no official status, the TS has been signed by both Paige Patterson*, president of the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary mentioned above and Chuck Kelley, president of the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary in New Orleans, Louisiana. The issue in this controversy is the soteriological direction of our denomination. Shall we return to our roots (the Abstract) or shall we progress in a new direction (TS)? Dr. Hankins, in his 2017 speech at the Connect 316 Banquet made his position clear. He said unequivocally, “I believe that we need to call for the removal of the Abstract of Principles as the confessional statement of Southern and Southeastern.”

But why the concern? In 1986, Southwestern was perceived as the best seminary and students flocked to it because it was the inerrancy school. Today, however, both Southwestern and New Orleans are viewed differently. They are now seen as the TS friendly schools while Southern and Southeastern are seen as the Abstract seminaries. So what do the 2017-18 enrollment figures tell us. Well, according to the Association of Theological Schools’ most recent statistical report, the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, is now the largest seminary in the world with 3,157 students. That’s a 36.3% increase from 1986. Southeastern’s enrollment has also climbed an impressive 99.4% in the same period. But Southwestern’s enrollment, while still large, is considerably smaller than it was 32 years ago. It’s enrollment has dropped 36.8% since 1986; New Orleans’ has fallen 17.2%.

So then why are students now flocking to Southern and Southeastern? It’s definitely not because it’s cheaper. In 2017, the estimated price for a married student to attend Southern was actually the highest of all SBC seminaries (74% higher than Southwestern).  So what is the attraction? 32 years ago students went to Southwestern because of inerrancy, and inerrancy won the day. Could it be that students today want a school where historic Southern Baptist doctrines (the Abstract) are actually believed and taught? If so, then the Abstract could possibly win the day. No doubt about it, if Southwestern and New Orleans were growing like Southern and Southeastern, the Hankinists would not be nearly as alarmed.

*It’s interesting to note that Paige Patterson also signed the Abstract of Principles when he was president at Southeastern. What mental gymnastics he used to affirm two irreconcilable statements is anyone’s guess.

The Whole Truth

At last year’s Southern Baptist Convention, Dr. Eric Hankins spoke at the annual Connect 316 Banquet which was held in conjunction with the convention. See http://sbctoday.wpengine.com/loyal-opposition/.  While discussing Calvinism in general, Hankins at one point focused directly on Albert Mohler, the president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. Without any context, he told the audience that Mohler “said right to my face in front of a gathering in a lecture hall at Southern that he thought my soteriology was deficient.” At first blush, that sounds ominous.  But what Hankins did not convey is what Mohler said next. He [Mohler] explained,

It is simply because I think my soteriology is ‘righter’ than yours, more correct, that’s why I hold to it. . . . I’m playing around just a little bit in order to say we have two people who disagree.  If you actually believe what you believe then you believe the point of disagreement is a deficiency in the other person’s thinking. In other words, you also believe that my soteriology is deficient.”

To which Hankins clearly responded, “Correct.”

So for the sake of full disclosure, Hankins likewise told the lecture hall at Southern that he thought Mohler’s soteriology was deficient.

Ergo, Mohler’s words take on a much more benign meaning in light of the full context.

To see the full Hankins/Mohler exchange, see  https://vimeo.com/78882127. The quotes above start at the 15:16 mark.

Traditional Statement: A Baptist/Methodist Hybrid?

In my life, I’ve been a member of six Southern Baptist churches in three states  – from urban to rural, from small to First Baptist size.  And all of these churches had or have a contingent of former United Methodists (UMC).  Why is that important?  Because Eric Hankins’ so-called Traditional Statement, if anything, reflects what many Southern Baptists believed in the 1950-70s, which I might add was also a time when many Bible believing Methodists in the southern United States (with much of their Arminianism intact) were abandoning the liberal United Methodist Church and were often being received into the more conservative Southern Baptist churches.  In fact, the United Methodist Church was still the largest Protestant denomination in the United States in 1964.  But 1964 is also the year it began its precipitous decline.  In 1967, the Southern Baptist Convention overtook the Methodists and now is more than double the UMC in membership.  So how many Methodists “converted” to the Baptist churches?  We can’t know for sure because Southern Baptist church records show such additions as baptisms not transfers.  Yet the anecdotal evidence suggests that the incoming Methodist wave was large.  Also, the ones who left Methodism over the issue of the Bible were probably the more zealous type.  So would such a large influx of Bible-believing, zealous Methodists affect Southern Baptist thought?  If so, maybe what Hankins is calling “Traditional Baptist” doctrine reflects more of Wesley’s soteriology than Spurgeon’s.

Of course, many Hankinists would demur by saying that they are neither Calvinist or Arminian.  Okay, but that’s where the “hybrid” qualification comes into play.  A mule is neither a donkey or a horse but the offspring of both – it is a hybrid (with an entirely distinct number of chromosomes).  So then could Hankinism actually be a Baptist/Methodist hybrid – not historically one or the other but the offspring of both?  I wonder.

The More Traditional Baptist Statement

The signers of the Traditional Statement claim to represent traditional Southern Baptist beliefs. If this is true, they should have no problem in assenting to the 1925 Baptist Faith and Message (BFM), the denomination’s official doctrinal statement from 1925-1963. But they do have a problem. Concerning man, the 1925 BFM says Adam

was created in a state of holiness under the law of his Maker, but, through the temptation of Satan, he transgressed the command of God and fell from his original holiness and righteousness; whereby his posterity inherit a nature corrupt and in bondage to sin, are under condemnation, and as soon as they are capable of moral action, become actual transgressors.”

Notice that in the 1925 BFM, it says Adam’s posterity are “under condemnation” prior to their actual becoming transgressors. Why? Because of Adam’s sin – The Fall. And yet Article 2 of the Traditional Statement contradicts this by saying “Each person’s sin alone” (italics added) “brings the wrath of a holy God . . . and condemnation.” The phrase “each person’s sin alone” in the Traditional Statement is deliberate. It is there to emphasize the belief that Adam’s sin brought no one under condemnation except Adam.*  Make no mistake, this difference has major implications for other important doctrines, particularly the doctrine of imputation and possibly for the gospel itself.

So could thoughtful signers of the Traditional Statement also affirm the more traditional 1925 BFM? Or better yet, could thoughtful adherents of the 1925 BFM agree with the Traditional Statement? The obvious answer to both questions is no.

*The Traditional Statement’s assertion that “each person’s sin alone brings . . . wrath . . . and condemnation” is just a roundabout way of denying inherited or imputed guilt from Adam.  And in fairness, there are some modern-day Calvinistic Baptists, even some who subscribe to the Abstract of Principles, who likewise object to inherited guilt, but they [the Calvinists] draw markedly different conclusions when it comes to other consequences of the Fall.

Testing the Waters?

Back in November of 2016, Rick Patrick, executive director of a group called Connect 316, was allowed to speak in chapel at the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, TX. Connect 316 is a group that has been promoting Eric Hankins’ Traditional Statement (hereafter called TS) within the Southern Baptist Convention since 2012. It is also important to note that Paige Patterson, the president of Southwestern, is one of less than .01% of all Southern Baptists who have actually signed on to the TS.

During Patrick’s talk, as you would expect, he promoted Connect 316 and by extension the TS (watch/listen here). He also attacked Calvinism, calling it a “Trojan horse.” Well okay. Southwestern is an institution of higher learning. In fairness, we would expect to hear from the other side, right?  No.  Instead, Dr. Patterson piled on with this:

“I know there are fair number of you who think you are a Calvinist, but understand there is a denomination which represents that view. It’s called Presbyterian.

“I have great respect for them. Many of them, the vast majority of them, are brothers in Christ, and I honor their position, but if I held that position I would become a Presbyterian. I would not remain a Baptist, because the Baptist position from the time of the Anabaptists, really from the time of the New Testament, is very different.”

After a firestorm ensued, Dr. Patterson kind of walked back his statement the next day. But this raises some serious questions. Here we have a man, Dr. Patterson, who was one of the main players, if not the main player, in the Conservative Resurgence back in the 1980s. This man knows how to play the political game (and yes it is definitely a political game) within the convention. Are we now supposed to believe that he naively invited Rick Patrick to Southwestern unaware of what was going to be said? Remember Dr. Patterson signed the TS. What was the motive for this chapel service?

A few years back, reputable people in the leadership of Louisiana College claimed that the TS was being pushed as the school’s doctrinal statement by none other than David Hankins, the Executive Director of the Louisiana Baptist Convention and Eric Hankins’ father. And Hankins might have been successful had it not been for all the other shenanigans going on at Louisiana College.  So for the moment, despite Hankins’ best efforts, the Baptist Faith and Message remains as Louisiana College’s official doctrinal statement.

But it makes one wonder, was this chapel service at Southwestern another testing of the waters to see if there is finally a climate to push something akin to the TS, but this time in Texas?  If so, I would guess the Connect 316ers are a little disappointed with the feedback.

P.S.  As an aside, for those who think they descend theologically from the Anabaptists, please understand there is a denomination which represents that view as well. It’s called the Mennonites.

Molinism: Not a Chance

While some may acknowledge that Molinism is a kind of election, they may also believe that their personal salvific choice still plays a significant role as to who is in fact elected unto salvation (including and especially their own salvation). Below I will attempt to show why this is blatantly false.

The closest U.S. presidential race in modern history occurred in the year 2000 when George W. Bush edged Albert Gore by a few hundred votes in Florida, which in turn gave Bush the victory in the Electoral College. While that vote was extraordinarily close – triggering a recount in the state – it is important to remember that if any single voter in Florida had changed his/her vote, the outcome would have been exactly the same. In other words, no single vote determined who was elected President of the United States.

Of course, we sometimes hear of local elections decided by extremely narrow margins. I remember years ago a local election in Lafayette County (Mississippi) that wasn’t decided until the absentee ballots were counted, and even then the incumbent won by less than five votes. Still, the changing of one single vote in that election would not have changed the outcome. In fact, it is stunningly rare to have an election of any type decided by a single vote. And when you are talking about elections involving millions of people voting – the U.S. Presidential race, for example – it just doesn’t happen. This is because the larger the number of people voting in an election, the less likely that any one vote will make the difference.

As referenced in a previous post, Molinism teaches that God actualizes the one possible world where He foresees the largest number of people with libertarian free will choosing salvation for themselves. In essence, it is an election involving billions upon billions of people choosing (or voting) within a nearly limitless number of possible worlds. So what’s the chance that my one choice would determine the outcome? Well, if we were talking about just the number of people alive at this moment in this one actual world, the chance of an election being decided by one vote out of 6 billion votes cast is something like 0.00000003 percent, which statistically speaking is a zero percent chance. Now add on the billions of other people who have existed but are now deceased and multiply that by myriads upon myriads of possible worlds – a number so large only God can comprehend it – and you begin to see the utter hopelessness of your choice deciding the outcome. You would have a much greater chance of winning the lottery a thousand times per second every second of your life.  That may sound absurd, but that’s the point – we are talking about something that is utterly absurd and impossible.

Without Jehovah ordaining the outcome of all free will salvific choices, then we’re left to chance. And make no mistake, with Molinism, there is no chance whatsoever that one libertarian decision for or against Christ determines anything at all. Period. Not a chance.

Molinism: Predestined By the Winning Team

According to an article published by the website, SBC Today, Dr. Eric Hankins, made the following statement in 2013 about a belief system called Molinism.  He said “We need to be able to account for the relationship between God’s foreknowledge and His predestination, and we need to be able to account for how freedom does not impinge on God’s glory or His sovereignty.  I think Molinism gives the best account to date for these things.”

So what’s Molinism?  Briefly, Molinism is a philosophical system, a Christianized version of modality, that attempts to harmonize the concept of God’s absolute sovereignty over salvation with libertarian freewill while bringing salvation to as many people as possible.  It is extrapolated (not exposited) from Scriptures like Matthew 11:21, which reads, “Woe unto thee, Chorazin! woe unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works had been done in Tyre and Sidon which were done in you, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes.”  Molinism rests heavily on counterfactuals like the phrase “if the mighty works had been done in Tyre and Sidon . . . they would have repented long ago . . .”  From this Molinists postulate that there is not only a possible world where Tyre and Sidon would repent, but more importantly there are myriads of possible worlds, too numerous for us to comprehend, that God in His omniscience knows all too well.  So Jehovah, before creation, looked at all these possible worlds – using something called middle knowledge – and in His sovereignty actualized the one possible world where the largest number of people would freely choose salvation.  And make no mistake, with Molinism this actualized world will come to pass – it is predestined.

So clearly with Molinism, the doctrine of election still exists, but there is no special electing love for me individually.  Rather God elects people based on their future choices in relation to the choices of every other person who has ever lived or will live.  So to be elect according to Molinism, my right choosing must also occur in the one possible world where the largest number of other people make that same choice, that is, I must be on the winning team.  Why?  Because God’s electing purpose is not my salvation per se, but to save the largest number of people possible.  In fact, I might have made the salvific choice in most possible worlds.  I might have even made the salvific choice in all but one possible world, but if the one world God actualizes is the one where I choose wrongly, then I’m completely out of luck just like the  residents of Tyre and Sidon mentioned above.  You see, Molinism’s election is really not about you or me specifically.  It’s about maximizing results.

So why is understanding the Molinist idea of election important?  Because while many Southern Baptists reject the doctrine of election, their reason for doing so is not because they seek to defend libertarian free-will as a concept.  That’s not the issue.  Rather, they see free-will as the vehicle whereby fairness (or justice) is preserved in the actual world, not in a plethora of possible worlds.  Consequently, Molinism, when rightly understood, would be no better in their eyes than Calvinism, maybe even less so.  At least with Calvinism your destiny is determined by the all-wise counsel of an infinitely good God alone.  With Molinism, you are predestined by the winning team.

Blog Note: Dr. Eric Hankins has left First Baptist Church in Oxford, and our prayers are with him and First Baptist.  His leaving does not appear to have any direct connection to the Traditional Statement pro or con.  So for the moment, as opportunity arises, the Oxford Baptist Underground will continue to interact with Hankins’ public comments and the comments of others who support the Traditional Statement.

The Danger of the Sinner’s Prayer

At the 2012 Southern Baptist Convention, the pastor of Oxford’s First Baptist Church, Dr. Eric Hankins, presented a resolution in favor of what is called the sinner’s prayer (a revised version of that resolution was adopted by the convention).  For those who may not know, the sinner’s prayer is an evangelism technique (sometimes called drawing the net) used by Evangelicals, including many Southern Baptists, whereby a person is led to repeat a certain prayer, often word for word.  Strangely, the exact wording of the prayer is not really that important so long as it contains language whereby the “convert” admits to being a sinner, says that he/she is sorrowful because of sin, and conveys a desire that God would forgive.  Of course, there is nothing wrong with someone praying that God would have mercy on them.  What is wrong is to equate praying the sinner’s prayer or any prayer with conversion.  In Romans 5:1, the Apostle Paul wrote, “Being therefore justified by faith, we have peace with God through our Lord Jesus Christ.”  Therein lies the danger – it is faith in Christ, not prayer that saves, and we must not conflate the two.  Granted, prayer is the breath of saving faith, but words can be uttered even when there is no faith in the heart.  As our Lord said in Matthew 15:8, “This people honoreth me with their lips; But their heart is far from me.”  So if we give people the impression that they are justified because they have mouthed some prescribed words we thereby undermine the Gospel itself.

As alluded to above, there is certainly nothing wrong with someone asking God to have mercy on them because of Christ’s substitutionary death for sinners on the cross.  But the idea that it is helpful to lead people in a specific prayer and then call that receiving Christ is wrongheaded.  Why?  Because, at best, it is unnecessary.  At worst, it deceives.

We know that such a prayer is unnecessary simply by looking at the example of Christ and the Apostles.  In Luke 18:18, the rich young ruler asked Christ, “Good Teacher, what shall I do to inherit eternal life?”  In Acts 16:30, the Philippian jailer asked Paul and Silas, “Sirs, what must I do to be saved?”  Then in Acts 2:37, those present on the Day of Pentecost who were convinced they were guilty of crucifying Christ asked Peter and the other Apostles, “Brethren, what shall we do?”  While the responses to those questions differ, especially the one made by Christ, it is important to note that no one was told to pray any type of prayer.  This would be extremely odd if prayer is in any way necessary for conversion.

Regardless, some may argue from Romans 10:10 that prayer is still necessary in the conversion process.  That passage reads, “For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation.”  Clearly, the confession mentioned in this passage is predicated upon first believing with the heart.  But more to the point, the word translated “confession” does not indicate that it has to be a prayer.  For example, if a man were to sincerely say, “I am a great sinner, and my only hope is that the blood and righteous of Christ avail for me,” he has thus confessed with his mouth what he believes in his heart and is saved.  That is what the Bible calls a “good confession” (1 Timothy 6:12).  Granted, this verbal confession could be made in the form of a prayer as was the case with the publican in Luke 18:13, but even there the publican’s prayer was a spontaneous expression of what was already in his heart.  It was in no way a prescribed prayer.

Please note, however, that since true faith prays, prayer then is a necessary consequence or fruit of conversion, meaning those who are truly converted will pray, sometimes even without intelligible words (Romans 8:26).  This is altogether different from saying that prayer is a necessary component of conversion itself.  Prayer is not what brings us from death to life (conversion or regeneration).  And it is exactly at this point that the danger of deception lurks.  If a man believes he is justified because he prayed a prayer, regardless of the prayer, he has missed Christ and is deceived.  Prayer in this case, like the brazen serpent of old (Numbers 21:8-9; 2 Kings 18:4), has been misused and has become an idol.

Dr. Hankins and others would likely argue that the sinner’s prayer is but a helpful tool in leading people to Christ.  But if the tool can be deceiving and is actually unnecessary, why use it at all?  To put it another way, pretend you’re a physician, and you have a patient with a terminal illness.  Also pretend there’s a drug available that many believe might be useful in treating this disease, but there’s a problem.  The drug itself can be lethal.   Oh, and one more thing – this drug is completely unnecessary because there is another treatment that works just as well, if not better, without the dangerous side-effects.  Why then would any doctor use the unnecessary, dangerous drug?  And why would any preacher use the unnecessary, dangerous sinner’s prayer?

Sure, if a person wants to pray for God’s mercy, then by all means let them pray.  But as a physician to their soul, do not prescribe a prayer.  Rather, prescribe that blood-stained cross.  “He that hath ears to hear, let him hear.” (Matthew 11:15).