Oxford Baptist Underground

Originating From a Secret Bunker Dug By William Hosea Holcombe and J.B. Gambrell Somewhere Off the Square in Oxford, Mississippi

Monthly Archives: August 2017

Traditional Statement: A Baptist/Methodist Hybrid?

In my life, I’ve been a member of six Southern Baptist churches in three states  – from urban to rural, from small to First Baptist size.  And all of these churches had or have a contingent of former United Methodists (UMC).  Why is that important?  Because Eric Hankins’ so-called Traditional Statement, if anything, reflects what many Southern Baptists believed in the 1950-70s, which I might add was also a time when many Bible believing Methodists in the southern United States (with much of their Arminianism intact) were abandoning the liberal United Methodist Church and were often being received into the more conservative Southern Baptist churches.  In fact, the United Methodist Church was still the largest Protestant denomination in the United States in 1964.  But 1964 is also the year it began its precipitous decline.  In 1967, the Southern Baptist Convention overtook the Methodists and now is more than double the UMC in membership.  So how many Methodists “converted” to the Baptist churches?  We can’t know for sure because Southern Baptist church records show such additions as baptisms not transfers.  Yet the anecdotal evidence suggests that the incoming Methodist wave was large.  Also, the ones who left Methodism over the issue of the Bible were probably the more zealous type.  So would such a large influx of Bible-believing, zealous Methodists affect Southern Baptist thought?  If so, maybe what Hankins is calling “Traditional Baptist” doctrine reflects more of Wesley’s soteriology than Spurgeon’s.

Of course, many Hankinists would demur by saying that they are neither Calvinist or Arminian.  Okay, but that’s where the “hybrid” qualification comes into play.  A mule is neither a donkey or a horse but the offspring of both – it is a hybrid (with an entirely distinct number of chromosomes).  So then could Hankinism actually be a Baptist/Methodist hybrid – not historically one or the other but the offspring of both?  I wonder.

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