Oxford Baptist Underground

Originating From a Secret Bunker Dug By William Hosea Holcombe and J.B. Gambrell Somewhere Off the Square in Oxford, Mississippi

Tag Archives: Election

Molinism: Predestined By the Winning Team

According to an article published by the website, SBC Today, Dr. Eric Hankins, made the following statement in 2013 about a belief system called Molinism.  He said “We need to be able to account for the relationship between God’s foreknowledge and His predestination, and we need to be able to account for how freedom does not impinge on God’s glory or His sovereignty.  I think Molinism gives the best account to date for these things.”

So what’s Molinism?  Briefly, Molinism is a philosophical system, a Christianized version of modality, that attempts to harmonize the concept of God’s absolute sovereignty over salvation with libertarian freewill while bringing salvation to as many people as possible.  It is extrapolated (not exposited) from Scriptures like Matthew 11:21, which reads, “Woe unto thee, Chorazin! woe unto thee, Bethsaida! for if the mighty works had been done in Tyre and Sidon which were done in you, they would have repented long ago in sackcloth and ashes.”  Molinism rests heavily on counterfactuals like the phrase “if the mighty works had been done in Tyre and Sidon . . . they would have repented long ago . . .”  From this Molinists postulate that there is not only a possible world where Tyre and Sidon would repent, but more importantly there are myriads of possible worlds, too numerous for us to comprehend, that God in His omniscience knows all too well.  So Jehovah, before creation, looked at all these possible worlds – using something called middle knowledge – and in His sovereignty actualized the one possible world where the largest number of people would freely choose salvation.  And make no mistake, with Molinism this actualized world will come to pass – it is predestined.

So clearly with Molinism, the doctrine of election still exists, but there is no special electing love for me individually.  Rather God elects people based on their future choices in relation to the choices of every other person who has ever lived or will live.  So to be elect according to Molinism, my right choosing must also occur in the one possible world where the largest number of other people make that same choice, that is, I must be on the winning team.  Why?  Because God’s electing purpose is not my salvation per se, but to save the largest number of people possible.  In fact, I might have made the salvific choice in most possible worlds.  I might have even made the salvific choice in all but one possible world, but if the one world God actualizes is the one where I choose wrongly, then I’m completely out of luck just like the  residents of Tyre and Sidon mentioned above.  You see, Molinism’s election is really not about you or me specifically.  It’s about maximizing results.

So why is understanding the Molinist idea of election important?  Because while many Southern Baptists reject the doctrine of election, their reason for doing so is not because they seek to defend libertarian free-will as a concept.  That’s not the issue.  Rather, they see free-will as the vehicle whereby fairness (or justice) is preserved in the actual world, not in a plethora of possible worlds.  Consequently, Molinism, when rightly understood, would be no better in their eyes than Calvinism, maybe even less so.  At least with Calvinism your destiny is determined by the all-wise counsel of an infinitely good God alone.  With Molinism, you are predestined by the winning team.

Blog Note: Dr. Eric Hankins has left First Baptist Church in Oxford, and our prayers are with him and First Baptist.  His leaving does not appear to have any direct connection to the Traditional Statement pro or con.  So for the moment, as opportunity arises, the Oxford Baptist Underground will continue to interact with Hankins’ public comments and the comments of others who support the Traditional Statement.

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Would This Man Sign the Traditional Statement?

Hosea Holcombe is known as the Father of the Alabama Baptist Convention and is a legend among Alabama Baptists (see here and here).  He is also the father of William Hosea Holcombe, the founding pastor of the First Baptist Church in Oxford, Mississippi (per the historical marker prominently displayed outside the church sanctuary).

The elder Holcombe authored a book entitled A History of the Rise and Progress of Baptists in Alabama (published in 1840).  It that book he asserts:

The doctrine of election and predestination, is dreaded by many young preachers. They cannot reconcile those sublime points of doctrine with their views; and with the use of the means – the agency, and the accountability of man. But they should not condemn, as many do, because they are unable to comprehend this exalted subject.

He also writes:

We once heard a very popular preacher, who has preached much, in a number of the churches in Alabama, treating on the doctrine of election, “My hearers,” said he, “Jesus Christ is God’s elect; and when sinners believe in the Saviour, they are elected, and not before; this is all the election I read of in the holy Scriptures.” After the sermon was over, an older minister than himself remarked, “Well, my brother, I gave strict attention to your views, on the doctrine of election; now sir, you may judge which of the two it is most reasonable to believe, you or Paul; Paul says, ‘He hath chosen us in him, before the foundation of the world,’ and [you] brother, say ‘none chosen until they believe.’”

Prove (Test) All Things

The one who states his case first seems right, until the other comes and examines him (ESV). – Proverb 18:17

Below are two links to videos from Christian apologist and author James White analyzing Dr. Eric Hankins’ public comments concerning Reformed Theology.  Note that the analysis of Hankins’ comments on the first video doesn’t begin until the 15:20 mark.

Hankins on Unconditional Election

Hankins’ NOBTS Chapel Sermon on Election